St. Luke's Hospital
Main Number: 314-434-1500 Emergency Dept: 314-205-6990 Patient Billing: 888-924-9200
Find a Physician Payment Options Locations & Directions
Follow us on: facebook twitter Mobile Email Page Email Page Print Page Print Page Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Font Size
America's 50 Best Hospitals
Meet the Doctor
Spirit of Women
Community Health Needs Assessment
Home > Health Information

Multimedia Encyclopedia

    Print-Friendly
    Bookmarks

    Ovulation home test

    Luteinizing hormone urine test (home test); Ovulation prediction test; Urinary LH immunoassays; At-home ovulation prediction test; LH urine test

    An ovulation home test is used by women to help identify the time in the menstrual cycle when they're most likely to become pregnant

    The test works by detecting a rise in luteinizing hormone (LH) in the urine. Such a rise, or surge, signals the ovary to release the egg. This at-home test is often used by women to help predict ovulation.

    These kits can be bought at most drug stores.

    How the Test is Performed

    Ovulation prediction test kits usually come with five to seven sticks. You may need to test for several days to detect a surge in LH. The specific time of month that you start testing depends on the length of your menstrual cycle. For example, if your normal menstrual cycle is 28 days, you'll need to test on day 11 -- that is, the 11th day after you started your period.

    You will need to urinate on the test stick, or place the stick into urine that has been collected into a sterile container. The test stick will turn a certain color or display a positive sign if a surge is detected. A positive result means you should ovulate in the next 24 to 36 hours, but this may not be the case for all women. The kit's instruction booklet will tell you how to properly read the results.

    If you miss a day, you may miss your surge. You may also miss recording a surge if you have an irregular menstrual cycle.

    How to Prepare for the Test

    Do not drink large amounts of fluids before using the test.

    Ask your doctor if you need to stop taking certain drugs before using this test.

    Drugs that can decrease LH measurements include estrogens, progesterone and testosterone. Estrogens and progesterone may be found in birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy.

    The drug clomiphene citrate (Clomid) can increase LH levels. This drug is used to help trigger ovulation. Women taking this drug should wait three days after stopping the medicine before checking their LH levels.

    How the Test Will Feel

    The test involves normal urination. There is no pain or discomfort.

    Why the Test is Performed

    This test is most often done to determine when a women will ovulate. When trying to make a baby, many couples plan intercourse around ovulation, the time when the woman's ovaries release an egg. For women with a 28 day menstrual cycle, this release normally occurs between days 11 – 14. See: Pregnancy-identifying fertile days

    If you have an irregular menstrual cycle and are not sure when or if you are ovulating, an ovulation prediction kit can help.

    The ovulation home test may also be used to determine if you need to adjust doses of certain medications.

    Normal Results

    A positive result indicates an "LH surge" and is a sign that ovulation may soon occur. Read your specific manufacturer's instruction booklet for complete details.

    Risks

    Rare false positive results can occur. This means the test kit may falsely predict ovulation.

    Considerations

    If you are unable to detect a surge or do not become pregnant after using an ovulation prediction kit for several months, contact your doctor. You may need to see an infertility specialist.

    LH urine tests are not the same as at home fertility monitors. Fertility monitors are digital handheld devices that predict ovulation based on electrolyte levels in saliva, LH levels in urine, or your basal body temperature. These devices can store ovulation information for several menstrual cycles.

    References

    Falcone T. Women’s health. In: Carey WD, ed. Cleveland Clinic: Current Clinical Medicine 2010. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2010:section 14.

    Fritz MA, Speroff L. Induction of ovulation. Speroff L, Fritz MA, eds. Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2011:chap 31.

    BACK TO TOP

    • Pituitary hormones

      illustration

      • Pituitary hormones

        illustration

      A Closer Look

        Talking to your MD

          Self Care

            Tests for Ovulation home test

            Review Date: 6/2/2011

            Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington, School of Medicine; and Susan Storck, MD, FACOG, Chief, Eastside Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Redmond, Washington; Clinical Teaching Faculty, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

            The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
            adam.com

            A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Fire Fox and chrome browser.


            Back  |  Top
            About Us
            Contact Us
            History
            Mission
            Locations & Directions
            Quality Reports
            Annual Reports
            Honors & Awards
            Community Health Needs
            Assessment

            Newsroom
            Services
            Brain & Spine
            Cancer
            Heart
            Maternity
            Orthopedics
            Pulmonary
            Sleep Medicine
            Urgent Care
            Women's Services
            All Services
            Patients & Visitors
            Locations & Directions
            Find a Physician
            Tour St. Luke's
            Patient & Visitor Information
            Contact Us
            Payment Options
            Financial Assistance
            Send a Card
            Mammogram Appointments
            Health Tools
            My Personal Health
            mystlukes
            Spirit of Women
            Health Information & Tools
            Clinical Trials
            Health Risk Assessments
            Employer Programs -
            Passport to Wellness

            Classes & Events
            Classes & Events
            Spirit of Women
            Donate & Volunteer
            Giving Opportunities
            Volunteer
            Physicians & Employees
            For Physicians
            Remote Access
            Medical Residency Information
            Pharmacy Residency Information
            Physician CPOE Training
            Careers
            Careers
            St. Luke's Hospital - 232 South Woods Mill Road - Chesterfield, MO 63017 Main Number: 314-434-1500 Emergency Dept: 314-205-6990 Patient Billing: 888-924-9200
            Copyright © St. Luke's Hospital Website Terms and Conditions  |  Privacy Policy  |  Patient Notice of Privacy Policies PDF Sitemap St. Luke's Mobile