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    X-ray

    Radiography

    X-rays are a type of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light.

    An x-ray machine sendsindividual x-ray particles through the body. The images are recorded on a computer or film.

    • Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white.
    • Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight areas of the body) will also appear white.
    • Structures containing air will be black, and muscle, fat, and fluid will appear as shades of gray.

    How the Test is Performed

    The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. How you are positioned depends on the type of x-ray being done. Several different x-ray views may be needed.

    You need to stay still when you are having an x-ray. Motion can cause blurry images. You may be asked to hold your breath or not movefor a second or two when they image is being taken.

    How to Prepare for the Test

    Before the x-ray, tell your health care team if you are pregnant, may be pregnant, or if you have an IUD inserted.

    Metal can cause unclear images. You will need to remove all jewelry and may need to wear a hospital gown.

    How the test is done depends on the specific type of x-ray.

    How the Test Will Feel

    X-rays are painless. However, some body positions needed during an x-ray may cause temporary discomfort.

    Risks

    X-rays are monitored and regulated so you get the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image.

    For most conventional x-rays, the risk of cancer or defects is very low. Most experts feel that benefits of appropriate x-imaginggreatly outweight anyrisks.

    Young children and babies in the womb are more sensitive to the risks of x-rays. Tell your health care provider if you think you might be pregnant.

    For more information, see the specific x-ray topics:

    • Abdominal x-ray
    • Barium x-ray
    • Bone x-ray
    • Chest x-ray
    • Dental x-rays
    • Hand x-ray
    • Joint x-ray
    • Lumbosacral spine x-ray
    • Neck x-ray
    • Pelvis x-ray
    • Skull x-ray
    • Thoracic spine x-ray
    • X-ray of the skeleton

    References

    Mettler FA. Introduction: an approach to image interpretation. In: Mettler FA, ed. Essentials of Radiology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2005:chap 1.

    Goldstone K, Yates SJ. Radiation issues governing radiation protection and patient doses in diagnostic imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger& Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 5th ed.New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 9.

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      A Closer Look

        Self Care

          Tests for X-ray

          Review Date: 8/14/2012

          Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.

          The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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