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    Cataract - adult

    Lens opacity; Age-related cataract

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye.

    Causes

    The lens of the eye is normally clear. It acts like the lens on a camera, focusing light as it passes to the back of the eye.

    Until a person is around age 45, the shape of the lens is able to change. This allows the lens to focus on an object, whether it is close or far away.

    Asa personages, proteins in the lens begin to break down. As a result, the lens becomes cloudy. What the eye sees may appear blurry. This condition is known as a cataract.

    Factors that may speed cataract formation are:

    • Diabetes
    • Eye inflammation
    • Eye injury
    • Family history of cataracts
    • Long-term use of corticosteroids (taken by mouth) or certain other medications
    • Radiation exposure
    • Smoking
    • Surgery for another eye problem
    • Too much exposure to ultraviolet light (sunlight)

    In many cases, the cause of cataract is unknown.

    Symptoms

    Cataracts develop slowly and painlessly. Vision in the affected eye slowly gets worse.

    • Mild clouding of the lens often occurs after age 60. But it may not cause any vision problems.
    • By age 75, most people have cataracts that affect their vision.

    Problems with seeing may include:

    • Being sensitive to glare
    • Cloudy, fuzzy, foggy, or filmy vision
    • Difficulty seeing at night or in dim light
    • Double vision
    • Loss of color intensity
    • Problems seeing shapes against a background or the difference between shades of colors
    • Seeing halos around lights
    • Frequent changes in eyeglass prescriptions

    Cataracts lead to decreased vision, even in daylight. Most people with cataracts have similar changes in both eyes, though one eye may be worse than the other. Often there are only mild vision changes.

    Exams and Tests

    A standard eye exam and slit-lamp examination are used to diagnose cataracts. Other tests are rarely needed, except to rule out other causes of poor vision.

    Treatment

    For early cataract, the eye doctor may recommend the following:

    • Change in eyeglass prescription
    • Better lighting
    • Magnifying lenses
    • Sunglasses

    As vision gets worse, you may need to make changes around the home to avoid falls and injuries.

    The only treatment for a cataract is surgery to remove it.If a cataract is not making it hard for you to see, surgery is usually not necessary. Cataracts do not harm the eye, so you can have surgery when you and your eye doctor decide it is right for you. Surgery is usually recommended when you cannot do normal activities such as driving, reading, or looking at computer or video screens, even with glasses.

    Outlook (Prognosis)

    Vision may not improve to 20/20 after cataract surgery if other eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, are present. The eye doctor (ophthalmologist) canoften determine this in advance.

    Early diagnosis and treatment are key to preventing permanent vision problems.

    Although rare, a cataract that goes on to an advanced stage (called a hypermature cataract) can begin to leak into other parts of the eye. This may cause a painful form of glaucoma and inflammation inside the eye.

    When to Contact a Medical Professional

    Call for an appointment with your health care provider if you have:

    • Decreased night vision
    • Problems with glare
    • Vision loss

    Prevention

    The best prevention involves controlling diseases that increase the risk of a cataract. Avoiding exposure to things that promote cataract formation can also help. For example, if you smoke, now is the time to quit. Also, when outdoors, wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from harmful UV rays.

    References

    American Academy of Ophthalmology Cataract and Anterior Segment Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern Guidelines. Cataract in the Adult Eye. San Francisco, Ca: American Academy of Ophthalmology; 2011. Accessed August 29, 2013.

    Zigler JS Jr, Datiles MB III. Pathogenesis of cataracts. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology on DVD-ROM – 2013 Edition. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 1, chap 72B.

    Howes FW. Indications for lens surgery/indications for application of different lens surgery techniques. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2008:chap 5.4.

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          Tests for Cataract - adult

            Review Date: 8/24/2013

            Reviewed By: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, Ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La Jolla, California. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

            The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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